New Case Study: Crystal Key Tags

Purposes:

2-D or 3-D crystal key tags with Red, green or blue internal led light complete with upscale nickel plated key ring, light up a dark entryway. The stock shape is rectangular, and the imprint can be etched in the crystal, on the crystal, or both. This gift comes in a deluxe packaging, so it’s perfect for gift-giving, trade shows, and business gifts.

Market: Education

Objective: Shine a light on a very serious issue, and provide an affordable, but practical promotional product to be part of a gift bag conference attendees were receiving.

Strategy: A conference was planned on a state college campus by the state’s Human Trafficking Task Force in an effort to “shine a light” on human trafficking.” The cost to attend the conference was $125. After the event, each attendee of the conference received a gift bag full of contact information, souvenirs, and marketing collateral.  The symbolic, but practical crystal key tag was selected for the promotional bag, because it went the theme of “shining a light” on a serious issue.

Results:  In the conference, one speaker used the promotional item to start a social media campaign. All of the attendees were asked to pose with the crystal key tag and post a selfie on the taskforce’s Facebook page. Approximately 749 people posted on a selfie with the light on, to bring this very serious issue into the light. The Facebook page gained 204 additional likes, and several people inquired on how and where to get the key tag to help “shine a light on human trafficking in Michigan.”
 

  • On/off switch to conserve replaceable battery
  • Stock rectangular shape, with a 2D or 3D imprint etched in the crystal, on the crystal, or both
  • Production time: 15 working days
  • red, green and blue LED light

 

Crystal Key Tags

Case Study: Challenge Coins

Purposes: The Die Cast Challenge Coin is detailed and created for a high perceived value. They are perfect for any type of recognition and carry more meaning and value than can be calculated.

Market: Military

Objective: To recognize a new level of achievement in the armed forces

Strategy: People who serve in the armed forces aren’t there for personal gain; they are often there to serve a bigger purpose than themselves. Honor and prestige is almost a form of currency to them. For decades, the challenge coin has been offered to show recognition for an accomplishment, and it’s no different in this case. The custom shape, edge, and finish allowed for a truly original coin.

Results: The challenge coins were beautiful and carried a high level of prestige. They were awarded after reaching a new level in accomplishment for a branch of the military. They were a perfect award for the occasion.

  • Pricing includes a custom shape with one or two-sided 2D imprint with no tooling charge for pierced or cutout areas
  • Choice of metal finishes: bright nickel, bright copper, black nickel, antique brass or antique copper
  • Other sizes and finishes available and quoted upon request
  • See Enhancements tab for more options, including custom edges, thickness, and textures
  • Individual poly bag standard, see Packaging tab for more options
  • Production time: 3-4 weeks – rush available
Challenge Coin

My Start in the Emblematic Jewelry Business by Steve Weinstein

When I was in High School, my family business was a small struggling woodworking factory. We made ornate cabinets and cornices in the style of Louis XIV and a line of inlaid serving trays. It was a difficult market with slow growth, large inventory and high marketing costs. One day a family friend and local Distributor came to the factory. He had a need for some award plaques that his Supplier could not meet and asked my father if we could make them. “If it’s made of wood we can make it” was my father’s proud reply.

The next day the Distributor returned to pick up his order. “These are beautiful! There’s nothing of this quality available in our industry. What do I owe you?” My dad, sensing an opportunity replied “I don’t know, I never made one before. What are they worth?”. He told us, and a few months later we were exhibiting at our first trade show in New York.”

A few years later I had come into the business full time, and was tasked with scheduling production of the awards portion of our product line. We had begun to acquire a reputation for producing custom products, and a Distributor brought us a project for desk pen sets. Part of the project involved insetting a custom medallion in the base. Our domestic source for casting medallions could not produce them at the required price point, so my Dad asked another Distributor friend for a referral. He was given a contact in Taiwan who made coins, which was passed to me for follow up. I sent a Telex (fax machines had yet to be invented) to the Taiwanese factory owner, who gave an acceptable estimate. I sent detailed specifications and payment via Express Mail, and about 8 weeks later the medallions arrived.

My father was so impressed that he gave me the project of adding emblematic products to our line, making me proprietor of that part of the business. About 15 years later I sold the woodworking part of the business and Emblem Marketing Team or EMT was born. Our line of products has diversified and grown over the years, but we remain focused on our core products of lapel pins, medals, key tags and embroidered emblems.

 

The Chief Emblemologist tells his story

 

Take the EMT Speed Challenge: Coins, Medals and Dog Tags!

Production time for Challenge Coins and Medals: 8 Working Days!
Production time for Dog Tags: 5 Working Days!

 

Speed Challenge Coins, Medals and Dog Tags in 8 days or less!

 

The Rules of the Challenge Coin

Categories: Causes, Coins
Comments: No Comments
Published on: June 4, 2013

Challenge Coin Rules and history posted by Goat Locker.

1. Rules of the coin game must be given or explained to all new coin holders.

2. The coin MUST be carried at all times. You can be challenged for it anywhere, at any time. You must produce the coin without taking more than 4 steps to produce it.

3. When challenging, the challenger must state whether it is for a single drink or a round of drinks.

4. Failure to produce a coin, for whatever reason, results in a bought round or single drinks (whatever the challenger stated). This type of transaction could be expensive, so hold onto your coin. Once the offender (coinless challengee) has bought the drink or round, they can’t be challenged again.

5. If all that are challenged produce their coins, the challenger loses and must buy the drinks for all respondents. This too can be expensive, so challenge wisely.

6. Under no circumstances can a coin be handed to another in response to a challenge. If a person gives their coin to another, that person can now keep the coin — it’s theirs!!! However, if a person places the coin down and another person picks it up to examine it, that is not considered giving and the examiner is honor-bound to place the coin back where they got it. The examiner can’t challenge while they hold another’s coin. After negotiating a “reasonable” ransom”, the examiner must return the member’s coin.

7. If a coin is lost, replacement is up to the individual. A new coin should be acquired at the earliest opportunity — losing a coin and not replacing it doesn’t relieve a member of his or her responsibilities. This is especially true if your fellow CPO’s know that you traditionally carry a coin.

8. There are no exceptions to the rules. They apply to clothed or un-clothed. One step and an arms reach are allowed.

9. A Coin is a Coin. They are not belt buckles, key chains or necklaces. Coins worn in a holder around the neck are valid.

10. The coin should be controlled at all times. Giving a coin to just anyone is like opening a fraternity to just anyone. It is an honor to be given a coin, let’s keep it that way. A given or awarded coin is of more personal value than a purchased coin.

11. No holes may be drilled in a coin.

12. The above rules apply to anyone who is worthy to be given/awarded a coin, has a purchased coin, or who is known to be a previous coinholder.

 

The origin of Challenge Coins

Categories: Coins, Recognition
Comments: No Comments
Published on: May 22, 2012

EMT customers realize that challenge coins are an important part of their client’s recognition programs. But not everyone is aware of the role challenge coins have played in the rich history of our military, or where the tradition originates.

Like many military traditions, the origin of the challenge coin is a subject of debate. The most commonly repeated origin story stems from World War I, and involves a pilot from the U.S. Army Air Corps. (more…)

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