Testimonial: Steve Weinstein, President

“I have known Steve for more than a decade and can say from both my strategic business brain and from my heart, there is no one more focused and driven to provide high quality service and products for his customers than Steve and EMT.

I’ve seen Steve diversify his company and product line in order to meet the needs of a changing promotional products industry. He makes wise and innovative choices about what to add and also deduct from his product line. Although he is well known in the industry for his strong opinions on what works and what doesn’t, he is flexible enough to try  new things.

Steve knows the promotional product business. I consider him a great adviser in matters of business. But most of all I consider him a friend.”

Vicky Tirpack, Promo Marketing

Steve Weinstein, President

Tradeshow Follow Up by EMT President Steve Weinstein

Trade shows. For some a necessary chore; for others an exciting opportunity. My first trade show experience was in 1974 at the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association show in New York City. We were new in the awards business and operating on a shoe string. There were four of us sleeping in one room at the Holiday Inn. Pizza and burgers cost three times our accustomed tariff. Sticker shock lurked around every corner. How much to carry my samples from the loading dock to my 10 foot booth? You must be kidding. Over $100 for a table? And I don’t get to keep it?

Today my budgets are a little more generous, but costs have increased exponentially. Budgeting is a key first step in trade show planning. If you don’t know what you expect to spend, you can’t know if the show was successful. EMT participates in a dozen or so trade shows in one format or another annually. The one thing that has not changed is the single element most essential to make the most of the trade show investment – Follow up. Boothmanship is important, an attractive booth is helpful and product knowledge is key, but one can do a merely adequate job of presenting at a show and still achieve outstanding results if leads are properly qualified and follow up is performed religiously.

You only know you’ve found it when you know what you’re looking for

Why am I here? That’s the first answer required in the quest for qualified prospects. The Promotional Products trade is unique among industries to which I have exposure. Ours is the one transaction in which my customer, the Distributor, cannot buy anything from me until he or she has already sold it. It is useless for me to greet attendees in my booth and attempt to close a transaction. My goal is to determine what type of customers the Distributor calls on and what applications she has for the products.

How do I get to be number 1?

This initial conversation sets the agenda for all that is to follow. A #1 lead is one who has clients that use my product and has an active project for which I can make a proposal. Less urgent grades are given to others who might be prospects in the future. Potential volume also is a component of determining follow up urgency and investment of resources. Notes, notes, notes. Write down what you talked about. Especially the prospect’s’ personal interests, kids, dogs, favorite meals when traveling and anything that will maintain the connection initiated in the booth.

Hound them unmercifully until I get an order

Well, not really. But almost. Fast, cogent and consistent communication keep our booth conversation top of mind in the clutter of trade show memories. Pertinent samples, virtual presentations and quotations make me stand out in a very crowded field. I am constantly amazed when Distributors tell me that requests made at a show go unfilled for weeks or months after an event. In this case not only does the early bird get the worm, the persistent bird gets the whole meal.

 

EMT President Steve Weinstein gives thumbs up

 

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Welcome , today is Friday, April 20, 2018